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Phoropter

If, during an eye examination, your doctor has discovered a vision problem like nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, it’s likely that one of the next steps you’ll take will involve a phoropter. A phoropter is special machine used to switch multiple lenses in front of your eyes to correct your vision.

Phoropters look imposing—like space-age visors—but are really an ingenious way to quickly determine the exact vision correction needed by your individual eyes.

By having you look through the phoropter at a visual reference, image, or the “Big E” chart (the Snellen chart), your eye doctor will help guide you toward lenses that correct your vision impairment by switching lenses within the machine on the fly.

How does a phoropter work?

The process of switching lenses in front of your eyes is less involved than it may look, given the imposing nature of the device. A phoropter is used to manually determine “refraction”—exactly how a lens must be shaped and curved to correct your vision to a normal state, nothing more.

Phoropters are subjective however, based on your visual perception and response to your eye doctor’s questions. Is your vision better, or worse? With this lens, or this lens? How about now?

There are other procedures and technologies available that automatically measure the refraction needed within your eye and produce a “prescription” measurement without your input. These are called autorefractors and aberrometers.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

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Dear Valued Patient,

We are reaching out to inform all of our patients that during this COVID-19 closure our office is remaining open on an appointment-only basis, meaning our doors will be closed except for scheduled eye emergencies or urgent visual or eye health needs. We are focused on addressing possible infections that could potentially become more severe over the next few weeks. The greater purpose is to alleviate any potential burden on hospital emergency rooms that would be caused by patients seeking attention for eye health needs. However, if you are in need of glasses or contacts in order to perform your necessary day-to-day functions we will also do our best to address your needs. We are following the CDC guidelines for treating patients in our office during this outbreak. We understand that these are unprecedented times, but we want you to know that we are here for you in the case that you have a true eye emergency or urgent need. If you are unsure if your case would constituent as urgent, please call our office and we would be glad to answer any questions or concerns that you may have and advise you as to a course of action.

Best regards,

Christopher Coker, OD